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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
is on an advisory board at the state department and one at the cia. so clearly, this man has got important matters on his desk. how exposed could we be if the chinese have access to all of his writings? >> very exposed. and this is nothing new. if you take a look at a typical burglar and he wants to break into a yard and has this hardened lock on a fence that he cannot cut through, what is he going to do? he's going to cut the chain. we're not going to go after a facility that spends billions of our tax dollars on securing their networks. we're going to go after somebody who works outside, somebody who has access to internal resources. it's called a u-turn attack. what they do is they find that weak link such as a home computer or a personal computer belonging to a former admiral or cia agent, and they attack that. they get access to that, and then they use their vpn connection inbound to get access to the same resources he would have access to or she would have access to based on their security level. megyn: because we're hearing more and more of this. they say the fbi's looking into -- it's not
that mean jack the cia director has to go to the defense director and said this is where i want to spend my money? >> guest: the office of the director of national intelligence cents a thousand four is responsible for negotiating the relationship with the secretary of defense. it is a difficult relationship. the department of defense, and i have seen this process, always tempted to reach into the intelligence committee and say, another 2 billion over there. let me just breezy dow little bit because i need is for my program over here. director of national intelligence. it's. >> guest: we have added more layers. it's not clear. >> host: on twitter. he says remember all of this spending contributes to gdp. cut military spending in there will be a job loss economic slowdown. >> guest: certain job losses for sure, and every drawdown we have done has involved a decline in employment. the we in question is not bill clinton. bush and clinton. it started under bush. 300,000 civil servants. coming out of the civil service. people come out of employment in the economy as well. what you have to keep in
of the cia. cedrick layton member of the joipt staff. what are those consequences? is the u.s. going to passing the point of no return here? >> well, it is, look, the most recent information suggests they're preparing to be able to launch these warheads containing gas and other chemical weapons. that's a problem because now, a military strike could trigger the dissemination of such weapons. what you have to do now is is get the timely tactical intelligence to interrupt the decision cycle. that is get between assad and the individual who presses the button to launch that missile. that's a very ask, very difficult, but now, that's the position we're really in. >> just to be honest, hasn't really seemed to be at least totally aware of everything happening every step of the way here. >> okay, except there was a wmd commission that looked at the failures in iraq and strengthened the committee. there are standards for assessing the credibility of sources. for how an analyst assesses a source and the information. and we know from the president's action against bin laden, he will ask the har
. is it too late? national security contributor fran townsend is a member of the cia and homeland security external advisory board and colonel cedric layton is a member of the staffs. what are the consequences? is the u.s. going to passing the point of no return here? >> it is. the most recent information suggests they're actually preparing to be able to launch these warheads containing sarin gas and other chemical weapons. that's a problem, right? now a military strike could inadvertently trigger the dissemination of such weapons, what you have to do is get the intelligence to interrupt the decision cycle. get between assad and the individual who presses the button to launch that missile. that's a very big ask from the intelligence community and very difficult. that's the positive we're really in. >> the intelligence community which to be honest hasn't really seemed to be at least, you know, totally aaware of everything happening every step of the way here. >> okay, except there's been -- there was a commission that looked at the failures in iraq and strengthened the intelligence communit
. possibly for the pentagon or cia. we don't know how serious that is. so far, it's all the same circle. >> that's right. >> musical chairs. >> musical chairs. the knock a lot of people in washington give to the obama white house it is too insular and he doesn't pull the kinds of expertise he needs into this white house. there's an opportunity in this second term for him to shake things up a little bit. you know, maybe to bring in new players, new faces who have been there from the clinton white house, and kind of help the dynamic and help the governing because a lot of people on capitol hill even democrats will tell you, he's not good at governing and building coalitions. maybe if he brought some folks in who knew how to do that there would be more give and take on the fiscal cliff issue, on the tax reform and entitlement reforms that we get next year, and there is a sense he really could use a bit of some fresh blood to make things a little easier going forward. >> chris, susan, and ari, thank you very much for all joining us. and the jobs report, more jobs are added in november than
the legacy of all of the bureaucrat particular power. >> former cia official says in recent month kim has purging 200 top officials, including powerful generals who had been loyal to his father. >> generals that are being elevated indeed are a bit more hardcore, hardlined than the generals that were originally in place. so if anything it's an indication that north korea is not going to be any more reform-minded under kim jong-unthan his spread says fors. >> in fact, he's a hardliner who got his fingerprints on the 2010 warship by north korea and the shelling of a disputedisland which killed four south koreans, wolf. he's kwn as a pretty bellicose general. >> people are worried about it right now. let's say they develop a missile with a warhead potentially capable of reaching the united states. what are the u.s. capabilities in terms of defending itself against such a missile? >> leon panetta said that the u.s. is very confident if north korea were to launch a missile at the united states, the american military could guard against it. that's a major reason why they are bolstering their pre
. they have a number for some of their devices. host: the cia director has to go to the defense secretary and say, this is how i want to spend my money? guest: the officer of the director of national intelligence that we have had since 2004 is responsible for negotiating the relationship with the secretary of defense. it is a difficult relationship. the department of defense is always tempted to reach into the intelligence of say, why is there another $2 billion over there? let me squeeze you down a little bit. intelligence says, no, don't do that. guest: we have now added more layers of bureaucracy. host: on twitter, remember all of this spending contributes to gdp. cut military spending, and there will be job losses, economic slowdown. guest: every drawdown we have done has involved the decline in employment in the pentagon. in the 1990's, we took 700,000 people in active duty forces. it was bush and clinton who did it. it started under bush in 1989. 300,000 civil servants, down from 1 million at the time. if the bulk of the active duty force structure, the civil service, would have to
. host: the cia director has to go to the defense secretary and say, this is how want to spend my money? guest: the officer of the director of national intelligence that we have had since 2004 is responsible for negotiating the relationship with the secretary of defense. it is a difficult relationship. the department of defense is always tempted to reach into the intelligence of say, why is there another $2 billion over there? but we squeeze you down a little bit. -- let me squeeze you down a little bit. intelligence says, no, don't do that. guest: would have no added more layers of bureaucracy. -- we have now added more layers of bureaucracy. host: on twitter, remember all of this spending contributes to gdp. cut military spending, and there will be job losses. economic slowdown. guest: every drawdown we have done has involved the decline in employment in the pentagon. in the 1990's, we took a 700,000 people in active duty force. it was bush and clinton who did it. it started under bush in 1989 and. 300,000 civil servants, down from 1 million at the time. if the bulk of the active duty
doctor who was a c.i.a. informant and helped us hunt down osama bin laden? he's reportedly been tortured in a pakinstani prison, according to his brother. back in june, the doctor was sentenced to 33 years behind bars for conspiring against pakistan. now six months into his sentence, is the united states doing enough to secure his release? let's talk to fox news legal analyst, peter johnson, jr. >> he's being left for dead. >> steve: he is? >> he's an honorary american. 3,000 lives, more, on september 11. >> steve: he's being tortured. >> he tried to get bin laden and infiltrated through a dna ruse, hepatitis vaccine. now he's been tortured, burned with cigarettes, according to reports. he's been shocked. he was blindfolded for a year. he had his hands tied behind his back for a year. the state department says we're trying to get him out. we're trying to negotiate a release. there was a bill the defense authorization act of 2013 trying to limit the $800 million going to counter insurgency funds in pakistan and saying, listen, the department of defense has to sign off that they're doing e
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)